Miriam Schaer

Body of Knowledge (male), 2002
Plastic figure, dye, linen thread. Book created and figure lined with text from Atlas of Surgical Operations, 17 x 7 x 6.5 inches, inset book 5 x 3.5 x .5 inches.
Body of Knowledge (female), 2002
Plastic figure, dye, linen thread. Book created and figure lined with text from Atlas of Surgical Operations. , 16 x 7 x 6.5 inches, inset book 4.5 x 2.5 x .5 inches.
$2000/the pair.
BOK(male)BOK(female)
BOK(female)detailBOK(male)detail




The Presence of Their Absence: The Portraits, 2013
Portfolio of 19 prints, slip sheeted with laser printed vellum, edition of 3, 14.25 x 9 x .75 inches. $2500
Portfolio_!

Portfolio_3

Witness, 2012
Hand-shaped, hand cut acid free paper, laser print, ink, sewn on hemp cords, edition of 5, 6.25 x 4.25 x 2 inches, $800
MSchaer_Witness_1
MSchaer_Witness2
Cinderella Ever After, 2013
Digitally printed on Whatman Wove, binder board, linen cord, linen thread, laval and Asahi book cloth, silk dye. Text by Mary Florio, edition of 9, 7.25 x 3.75 x 2 inches. $1200
Schaer_Cinderella_1Schaer_Cinderella_5
Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 16: You may not have kids and not care
about the future of our planet but I do, so recycle,
2012
Hand embroidery on Baby Dress 13 x 17. $900.00




Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 2: Childless women lack an essential humanity, 2010
Hand embroidery on Baby Dress, 16 x 15. $900.




Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 6: You still have time; maybe you’ll change your mind. You can adopt, 2010
Hand embroidery on Baby Dress, 14 x 20. $900.




Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 7: If you are so happy with your choice, why are you so angry with mine? 2011
15.5 x 18. $900.




Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 9: Your child is the best art you have ever made. You don’t need to make any other art work. 2012
Hand embroidery on Baby Dress, 19 x 15. $900.




Baby (not) on Board, The Final Prejudice? No. 14: Maternity is a strange compromise of narcissism, altruism, dream, sincerity, bad faith, devotion and cynicism, 2012
Hand embroidery on Baby Dress 16 x 14. $900.




Let them Scream, 2006.
Xerox transfer with Hand embroidery on doll dress. Text from The Storks, Hans Christian Anderson. (entire quote: Let them scream as much as they like. You will fly up into the clouds.) From the series The Poisoner’s Kiss. 14 x 14 x 12 in. $900.
let them scream




Bury us in the Garden, 2005.
Xerox transfer with Hand embroidery on doll dress. Text from Little Ida’s Flowers, Hans Christian Anderson. From the series The Poisoner’s Kiss (entire quote: Bury us out in the garden, where the canary lies; then we shall wake up again in summer, and be far more beautiful.) $900.
bury us in the garden




Hands of Josephus I
Hands of Josephus I is an altered book, created from a broken down copy of Flavius Josepus ‘Twenty books of The Jewish Antiquities, The Life of Josephus and the The Jewish Wars’. Each page, cut in the shape of hands is sewn on multiple beaded cords, then attached to wire hand forms, which are encrusted with beads. Josephus, a 1st century Jewish historian and apologist who survived and recorded the Destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD. His works give an important insight into first-century Judaism, while raising questions about who owns history. The hand of the victor it seems, always controls the every version of truth. This is the first book, of five.
Hands of Josephus: Part 1, 2006
Altered text from Josephus: History of the Jews, beads, wire hand forms
Unique book in series of five. 10.5 x 15 x 4 inches. $2000.

When Roses Cease to Bloom, 2006
When Roses Cease to Bloom celebrates the passing of the flowers, of life from spring to fall, and then from activity to idleness. Like the passing of an allergic reaction, the relief and also a bit of despair.
Girdle, acrylic, silk, found objects, digitally printing, jingle bells. Inset tunnel book 3’’ in diameter. Text by Emily Dickinson, Poem number 39, From part Three: Love. 16 x 19 x 13 inches, Unique. $1400.



Addictions Kiss, 2007
Addiction’s Kiss plays with the premise that plagues many-they want and fear, seek and repel love which affect many with an illness that can be come epidemic. Small golden hands grasping out to connect, and small golden pins are waiting to pierce-to deny access to the vulnerability that is essential for truest love. The text, from Ovid within deals with the abundance and the pain of love (As many as the shells that are on the shore, so many are the pains of love; the darts that wound are steeped in much poison. Ovid)
Girdle, acrylic silk, plastic doll arms, dressmaker pins, found objects. Text from Ovid. Unique. 21, x 11 x 9 inches. $1400.




Rules of Engagement #2 Attack where they are unprepared, 1996.
Hostess apron. Sizes Vary. Color Xerox, transfer, acrylic medium, hand embroidered text from Sun Tsu’s The Art of War. 24 x 44 in. $900.
miriamschaer-ROE-02-L




Rules of Engagement #6 The host encounters the guest at the border, 1996.
Color Xerox, transfer, acrylic medium, hand embroidered text from Sun Tsu’s The Art of War. 22 x 37 in. $900.
miriamschaer-ROE-06-L




Rules of Engagement, 2008.
Digitally printed book featuring the entire Rules of Engagement series by Miriam Schaer. 7 x 9 in. $40.
ROE cover-1




Statement

As an artist engaged with the book format, I work with a variety of non-traditional materials: fabric, clothing, found objects. I transfer, draw and stitch my texts. Using the language of clothing is the startin point for the books and objects I create.

Baby (Not) on Board: The Last Prejudice? addresses why so many people are angered by women who choose childlessness. The work is part of an ongoing exploration of our culture’s pejorative views about women without kids. Using red thread to create scarlet letters, I hand-embroidered representative negative comments on baby dresses. The statements taunt and accuse. Gathered from interviews with childless women, online research, and personal experience, the comments are typical of an endless flow of critical statements that seem to be growing bolder, even as non-traditional families are gaining greater acceptance.

Rules of Engagement, is a series of twenty hostess aprons. Each apron has transferred images idealized women, and is hand embroidered with quotes from Sun Tsu’s The Art of War, which I stumbled upon in an airport book store some years ago-aimed at business travelers. I thought, why not place Sun Tsu, and his strategies in a more domestic context.

Recently I have taken the entire series and put them together in a digitally printed book.

The Posioner’s Kiss was an installation, comprised of floating doll dresses, hanging in space, above a blanket of fallen leaves to create a forest of lost childhood. Each dress has quotes from classic fairy tales embroidered around its hem, and is printed with iconic images that reflect each quote. The quotes reflect the darker side of the tales, the anxiety of childhood and the fear of the unknown which color the unromaticized side of childhood. The background murals are made of the eyes of street children, who are the witnesses, unable to speak

Biography

Miriam Schaer is a multimedia book artist. She uses garments-girdles, bustiers, brassieres, aprons, children’s’ clothes-as her means of containment. Inside these stiffened, shaped, embellished enclosures, she conceals books and other objects that document her explorations of feminine, social, and spiritual issues. Since 1993, she has exhibited steadily and extensively in solo and group exhibitions, and her work has been mentioned in a long list of articles and reviews.

She is a recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts Artists Fellowship, is included in the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for the Feminist Art Base at the Brooklyn Museum. Ms. Schaer’s work has been represented in the Cheongju International Craft Biennale, in South Korea, and was an artist in residence for the Imagining the Book Biennale at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, in Alexandria, Egypt. She currently is a Lecturer in the Interdisciplinary MFA Program in Book and Paper at Columbia College in Chicago.

Miriam Schaer Website