Lizzie Burns

Stimulation Part I, 2010
A wearable sculpture of caffeine molecule as a necklace in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). Caffeine is a natural chemical found in many plants to help protect them from insects. Caffeine stimulates the brain through increasing chemicals which make us feel happy. It can help boost your mental and physical abilities. $250





Stimulation Part II, 2010
Wearable sculptures of caffeine molecule as earrings in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). $250





Sweetness, 2010
Wearable sculptures of honey molecule in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). Methyl phenylacetate is the natural chemical found in honey responsible for its delicious sweet aroma. Honey has long been used through history as a source of natural sweetness. $250





Chocaholic Part I, 2010
A wearable sculpture of phenethylamine molecule as a necklace in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). Phenethylamine is a natural chemical found within chocolate.  It has has been described as the major ‘chemical of love. Eating chocolate is linked to a boost in the brain chemicals serotonin and dopamine which make us feel happy. $250

Chocaholic Part II, 2010
Wearable sculptures of phenethylamine molecule as earrings in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches).  $250





Seasoning (Salt and Pepper), 2010
Wearable sculptures of piperine (pepper) molecule as a necklace, and salt molecules as earrings in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches).  Piperine is a natural chemical found in black pepper and responsible for its gentle warmth. Salt is essential to all life.  As one of our most basic tastes, salt has been treasured across the world and even used as a form of currency.  The pairing of salt and pepper dates to seventeenth century French cuisine.  $350





Hyperactive, 2010
Wearable sculptures of Ritalin molecule as earrings in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). Ritalin helps stimulate the brain.  It shares similarities with amphetamine and even cocaine but without such addictive effects. Ritalin can help avoid fatigue and increase concentration.  $250





Life thread Part I, 2010
Wearable sculpture of DNA molecule as a necklace in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches). Deoxyribonucleic Acid is the molecule of life.  The beautiful twists and turns of the double helix contain the instructions for your body encoded as genes. $250





Life thread Part II, 2010
Wearable sculptures of DNA molecules as earrings in silver, copper and anodized wire presented in black velvet in a box (3 x 4 x 4 inches).  $250





Statement

The inspiration behind these pieces…
We all share a curiosity and fascination in the world around us, explored by artists and scientists alike. I am on a journey using my scientific background to explore and expand into new territories. My passion for molecules was rekindled after recently creating a sculpture based on a pharmaceutical drug. While painting is my primary medium, I have been venturing into sculpture to create more personal pieces of artwork which can be brought outside a laboratory or art gallery. I have created these pieces especially for Central Booking to be given as tokens of love and affection, to stimulate conversation, to bring a sense of playfulness and delight to everyday life, and to remind us what truly matters in life.

Biography

Dr Lizzie Burns has always combined a deep and active interest in science and art. She gained a doctorate in cancer research from the University of Oxford followed by a 3-year research Fellowship before becoming a professional artist in 2002. Her work has been mentioned in the New York Times and described by the UK government’s former Chief Scientific Adviser, Sir David King as ‘an exciting, refreshing, optimistic view of medical sciences. Brilliant.’

Lizzie Burns Website